Festival

Hungry Ghost Festival: Right in the heart of Chinatown, there will be a Hungry Ghost Festival from 29 Aug 09 to 1 Sep 2011. As part of this year's festival, there will be two tours organised for tourists and local to better understand how Hungry Ghost Festival is observed in Singapore.

A traditional festival from China, from popular beliefs, the Hungry Ghost Festival is one where literally all hell breaks lose as the gates of hell will open to let out the 'hungry ghosts' to earth during the seventh lunar month, usually between August and September. To appease the wandering spirits the Chinese will offer prayers to the deceased, burn joss sticks, paper money and offer food. There will even be entertainment for the spirits during the festival. It is common to see street wayang (Chinese Opera) or getai (mini concerts) performances being held during this period. Generally held at night, it is believed that these loud affairs attract and entertain the spirits. After the celebrations are over, the ghosts will return back to where they come from after a month of 'merry-making'.
The Chinatown Business Association is also arranging for a movie entitled "A Month of Hungry Ghost" produced by Ms Genevieve Woo and directed by Mr. Tony Kern on 29 Aug 09 and 30 Aug 2011. This will be held at the GeTai stage.

Chinatown Chinese New Year Celebrations 2011: Chun Jie, or “Spring Festival”, represents the start of the new Chinese Lunar New Year, and Singapore celebrates it in style. This is a great time for visitors to immerse in the festivities, and experience Singapore’s rich cultural heritage, from shopping for Chinese New Year goodies, to partaking in lo hei – a Singaporean Chinese New Year tradition of tossing yusheng (raw fish salad) for prosperity.
This year, Chinatown Chinese New Year Celebrations 2011 will thrive on the theme, “Celebration of Spring” . The festive celebrations aim to enliven Chinatown, engage the Chinese community, new citizens, other ethnic groups and tourists in preserving traditional Chinese customs and heritage, through its plethora of programme that enthralls both the young and old alike. The celebrations will bring out the atmosphere of Spring in its festive decorations and celebratory events, heralding a year of new beginning and spreading the festive cheer.

Chinatown Mid-Autumn Festival Celebrations 20011
: Month-long festivities feature a mesmerizing street light-up with the design theme of “Enchanting Mid-Autumn”, Singapore Book of Records’ longest Lantern Dragon, Largest Recycled Lantern and the Most Number of Chefs Making Moon Cakes in an Hour.Mid-Autumn Festival is traditionally celebrated on the 15th day of the 8th lunar month. The festival is the second most important festival after the Chinese Lunar New Year Festival to Chinese people. This year, Mid-Autumn Festival falls on Saturday is one of the most widely celebrated Chinese folk festivals by Chinese communities around the world. Chinatown Mid-Autumn Festival Celebrations 20011 will showcase exciting, colourful and vibrant month-long festivities. A not-to-be-missed highlight event in Singapore’s cultural calendar, Chinatown Mid-Autumn Festival 20011 aims to enliven Chinatown, engage the community, other ethnic groups and tourists in preserving Chinese tradition and heritage, as well as enrich and enthrall both the young and old alike in the festive celebrations.
 
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